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Dr. Adam Seagrave ('05)Dr. Adam Seagrave ('05)“It would be a mistake to think that even the total defeat and eradication of the organization known as ISIS will result in long-term peace and an absence of radical Islamic terrorism in Europe and the United States,” writes Dr. Adam Seagrave (’05) in The Public Discourse. “There is a much more powerful and permanent reason behind radical Islamic terrorism: the motivation to die for an other-worldly cause inevitably overpowers the motivation to live for this world.”

An assistant professor of political science at Northern Illinois University, Dr. Seagrave is the author of The Foundations of Natural Morality: On the Compatibility of Natural Rights and the Natural Law and editor of Liberty and Equality: The American Conversation. A regular contributor to The Public Discourse, he laments that there is neither a military nor a quick resolution to the threat of radical Islamic terrorism.

“If Western culture continues to be defined by the pitiful desire to go on living in as much physical comfort as possible, we will continue to be victimized and oppressed by the much more powerful appeal of radical Islam to die for God and eternal happiness,” Dr. Seagrave observes. “We in the West need to work to understand better and persuasively articulate the moral vision underlying liberalism, connecting this moral vision to the theological principles of Christianity.”

Dr. Seagrave contends that, for the last 500 years, the West has struggled between two competing visions of liberalism. The first is the Hobbesian model, more prevalent in Europe, which reduces the purpose of life to the pursuit of survival, pleasure, and power. Then there is a Christian/Lockean counterpart, which historically has been more influential in the United States, and which places Hobbesian individualism within a spiritual and moral framework that satisfies man’s yearning for meaning and guides his actions toward the good. To the extent that the Hobbesian model continues to dominate Western thought, Dr. Seagrave argues, the West will remain vulnerable to radical Islam. Only the Christian/Lockean vision, he insists, can provide a viable alternative.

“If we in the West are ultimately to withstand the threat of radical Islam to our way of life, we would do well to draw upon the resources in our intellectual and religious traditions that are powerful enough to inspire its continuing defense,” Dr. Seagrave concludes. “Without consistent and widespread efforts to provide a coherent and compelling alternative philosophy and way of life, all the military might in the world will not be able to resist the onslaught of Islamic extremism.”

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