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Photos: Snow and a <br>Sacred Memory from the New England Chapel

Photos: Snow and a
Sacred Memory from the New England Chapel

Posted: March 7, 2019

At the end of last Sunday’s Mass in the College’s New England chapel — at which the Blessed Sacrament was reposed, for the first time, in the chapel’s sanctuary — Rev. Thomas Kocik told an old story about the building that would take a new significance later that night.

Said Fr. Kocik:

I don’t ordinarily make announcements at the end of Mass, but when you hear what I’m about to say, it will be obvious why I make this exception.

I am very grateful to have been given the honor of celebrating this special Mass, at which our Eucharist Lord was reposed in the tabernacle for the first time on this campus.

A friend of mine who graduated from Northfield Mount Hermon School [which formerly occupied the New England campus] in the early 1960s, and who later converted to Catholicism, recounted for me a remarkable experience she had here in Sage Chapel, an experience shared by approximately 500 girls, the elite boys choir that joined them from Mt. Hermon, and assorted guests. She said:

It was a crystal clear December night when we had processed into the chapel for that beloved annual Service of Carols. It was a beautiful program of sacred Christmas music, sung as flawlessly as we could manage, and gracefully reached the last anthem, to conclude with the line, “He is here and now, Jesus our Savior.” Then the director stepped down and bowed his head, while we gazed at the cross over his head, and all sound faded to stillness. Whereupon a bolt of lightning flashed from above, moving right to left setting the cross ablaze with searing light that made time seem to stand still. We froze in place. Eventually the director and organist nodded to each other for the choirs to leave the chancel and take their place in the darkness at the back of the church to sing the benediction a cappella. Departing in silence, outdoors we discovered the world around us had become blanketed with pure, beautiful snow, and the light of the stars was indescribably beautiful.

My brothers and sisters, faculty and friends of Thomas Aquinas College, in the light of this first Mass on campus, “He is here and now, Jesus our Savior” takes on new meaning. Adoremus in aeternum sanctissimum Sacramentum.

That evening, after the last of the guests had left the campus, it was blanketed, yet again, in pure, beautiful snow. Photos, taken the next morning, are available in the slideshow below:

  • Winter in New England 2019
    Slideshow: Winter on the New England campus
  • Winter in New England 2019
    Slideshow: Winter on the New England campus
  • Winter in New England 2019
    Slideshow: Winter on the New England campus
  • Winter in New England 2019
    Slideshow: Winter on the New England campus
  • Winter in New England 2019
    Slideshow: Winter on the New England campus
  • Winter in New England 2019
    Slideshow: Winter on the New England campus
  • Winter in New England 2019
    Slideshow: Winter on the New England campus
  • Winter in New England 2019
    Slideshow: Winter on the New England campus
  • Winter in New England 2019
    Slideshow: Winter on the New England campus
  • Winter in New England 2019
    Slideshow: Winter on the New England campus
  • Winter in New England 2019
    Slideshow: Winter on the New England campus
  • Winter in New England 2019
    Slideshow: Winter on the New England campus
  • Winter in New England 2019
    Slideshow: Winter on the New England campus
  • Winter in New England 2019
    Slideshow: Winter on the New England campus
  • Winter in New England 2019
    Slideshow: Winter on the New England campus
  • Winter in New England 2019
    Slideshow: Winter on the New England campus
  • Winter in New England 2019
    Slideshow: Winter on the New England campus
  • Winter in New England 2019
    Slideshow: Winter on the New England campus

John Jost (’17)

“When you first arrive here, the upperclassmen are almost like your heroes because they’re at the place — or approaching the place — where you want to be, both intellectually and spiritually. It promotes friendship in a way that I have never seen before.”

– John Jost (’17)

Algonquin, Illinois

“I am most grateful for Thomas Aquinas College’s resolute fidelity to the Church and her teachings. The young people whom you serve certainly are being formed to think with the Church and to defend the Faith with courage and charity.”

– The Most Rev. William E. Lori

Archbishop of Baltimore

Chair of the USCCB's Ad Hoc Committee on Religious Liberty

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