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Alumnus Talks to Students about Careers in Architecture

Posted: December 5, 2014

On Wednesday evening the Office of Career Services hosted a visit from Anthony Grumbine (’00), a design associate at Harrison Design in Santa Barbara, California. A graduate of the master’s program at the University of Notre Dame School of Architecture, Mr. Grumbine spoke about the state of architecture and the employment prospects for would-be architects today. He also discussed Notre Dame’s architecture program, calling it “the best thing going,” and telling the College’s students that, because of their classical background, they “have a great advantage at getting into it.”

The Notre Dame School of Architecture is unique among such programs because of its emphasis on classical design. As such, there has been a strong affinity between the School and the College, where students are accustomed to seeking the true, the good, and the beautiful. It was a Notre Dame professor, Duncan Stroik, who designed the College’s Our Lady of the Most Holy Trinity Chapel, and over the last decade some 10 Thomas Aquinas alumni have entered Notre Dame’s highly selective program, including two this fall. “There has been a steady average of about one TACer per year in the architecture school, which is by far more than any other school,” said Mr. Grumbine. “It has been a really good fit.”

architecture talkOver the course of his talk, Mr. Grumbine advised the College’s aspiring architects how to assemble a portfolio, how to improve their prospects for gaining admission into architecture school, and what they can expect to do should they study architecture at Notre Dame. “Anthony has a wealth of knowledge about art, architecture, and what it takes to get into and thrive in Notre Dame’s program,” said Director of Student Services Mark Kretschmer. “We are grateful to him for sharing his time and his advice with our students.” Mr. Grumbine’s talk was part of a series of ongoing career events that the Office of Career sponsors throughout the year.