Faith in Action Blog

Faith in Action Blog

Alumnus Paul Lazenby (’10), director of the College’s Annual Fund, is, in his spare time, an amateur aerial photographer. Using his trusty drone, he recently produced the above video, which beautifully captures the academic quadrangle, the walkable Stations of the Cross, the lower campus, and Our Lady of the Most Holy Trinity Chapel. It also features music by the Thomas Aquinas College Choir. Enjoy!


Patrick Cross (’14), self-portrait Patrick Cross (’14), self-portrait

This blog recently featured an illustrated tribute to martyred French priest Rev. Jacques Hamel, penned by alumnus cartoonist Patrick Cross (’14). The work is one of several cartoons that Mr. Cross — who is, by day, a counselor in the College’s Admissions office — has drawn in recent months as he launches a career in editorial cartooning. Already, his efforts have borne some success: Mr. Cross produces cartoons weekly for CatholicVote.org, as well as occasionally for GlennBeck.com.

“I’ve always been interested in politics, and I’ve always been interested in art,” Mr. Cross reflects. “But it was my parents who first suggested that I combine the two loves together in editorial cartooning.”

  • Patrick Cross Cartoons 2016
    Slideshow: Patrick Cross Cartoons
  • Patrick Cross Cartoons 2016
    Slideshow: Patrick Cross Cartoons
  • Patrick Cross Cartoons 2016
    Slideshow: Patrick Cross Cartoons
  • Patrick Cross Cartoons 2016
    Slideshow: Patrick Cross Cartoons
  • Patrick Cross Cartoons 2016
    Slideshow: Patrick Cross Cartoons
  • Patrick Cross Cartoons 2016
    Slideshow: Patrick Cross Cartoons
  • Patrick Cross Cartoons 2016
    Slideshow: Patrick Cross Cartoons
  • Patrick Cross Cartoons 2016
    Slideshow: Patrick Cross Cartoons

The idea began to take root during his Senior Year, when College Governor Berni Neal spoke at an on-campus career panel. Upon learning about Mr. Cross’ professional interests, Mrs. Neal revealed that she was friends with Michael Ramirez — the two-time Pulitzer Prize-winning cartoonist, formerly of the Los Angeles Times — and offered to arrange a meeting. “Ramirez was my favorite cartoonist growing up,” recalls Mr. Cross. “I went down to see him at the end of my Senior Year. We talked for about an hour and a half. That really put a fire in my belly.”

Mr. Cross began publishing his cartoons on his website and a Facebook page in January, and soon his work began generating attention. His goal, he says, is to produce cartoons that succeed on a variety of levels. “There are many layers,” he says. “You can have something that is funny in a slapstick sort of way. But some readers are looking for more.” Here, he adds, one sees the value and versatility of a classical education. “If you have an education that shows you how to identify principles, causes, effects, and prior causes, then you can do much better work.”

Patriotism infuses Mr. Cross’ art — a patriotism, he says, that has been with him all his life, but which deepened during his time at the College. “I’ve always loved the American founding. I’ve always believed in the principles of the country. But what my education at TAC really did, especially Junior Year, is show me why I believed in those things. In reading the Federalist Papers, the founders, and Abraham Lincoln — all in the context Aristotle’s Ethics and Politics, which we were studying in philosophy — I was able to locate the American experiment, or the American founding, in the context of the Western tradition. I came to a better understanding of why self-governance is good, why a government that promotes political prudence is such a gift, and also how we must not take any of it for granted.”


A tribute to Rev. Jacques Hamel, who was martyred today in Normandy, by alumnus cartoonist Patrick Cross (’14):

 


Cover: Alaska's Wild LifeFollowing the 2013 publication of her first children’s book, Monica Estill (’98) has recently released her first coloring book, Alaska’s Wild Life. The book features 32 black-and-white images of varying complexity designed to “spark creativity, relieve stress, and provide a window to explore an Alaskan dreamland.”

A 10-year resident of Anchorage, Monica describes herself as “a poet, artist, and philosopher.” Her previous work includes designing high-end residential interiors, creating sacred art, and her children’s book, The Bossy Boulder, the story of a rock who sits atop a mountain and — he thinks — the world, until time and change humble him. Like The Bossy Boulder, Alaska’s Wild Life features Monica’s quirky, detailed artistry, including images of a snowboarding fox and a mermaid swimming with a whale.

“Love is the real sunshine,” the author proclaims on the coloring book’s back cover, “and this is what I try to paint.”


Alumnus Author: Holy Week & Don Quixote

“There is a wisdom that belongs to idiots,” writes alumni author Sean Fitzpatrick (’02). “Don Quixote may be mad, but there are forms of madness that are divine.”

In a thoughtful piece for Crisis timed for Holy Week, Don Quixote and the Via Dolorosa, Mr. Fitzgerald considers Miguel de Cervantes’ Adventures of Don Quixote as a fitting Lenten read:

“The adventures of Don Quixote are a Passion where the spirit is willing but the flesh is weak. The novel takes up its cross, chapter after chapter, and follows after Christ. Chapter after chapter, the Knight of the Sorrowful Face falls, and, chapter after chapter, he gets up again and continues on. It is a book that plays out with all the pain and poignancy, all the humanity and humor, that composes the chivalric call of the Christian life. …

“[It] is the Lenten quest of every Christian soul: to bring harmony and order to times that are out of joint. What Don Quixote finds is that the world is sundered and senseless, and the work to rebuild among the ruins is treacherous. Though he is trampled and trounced time and again, Don Quixote resolutely rides on for the unity and wisdom of bygone days and is upheld by his vision as he battles through the divisions and disconnections of modernity.”

The headmaster of Gregory the Great Academy in Scranton, Pennsylvania, Mr. Fitzpatrick writes frequently for Crisis. The complete article complete article is available via the magazine’s website.


"Prodigal Son" - photo credit: Joan Marcus/©2016 Joan Marcus Prodigal Son - photo credit: Joan Marcus/©2016 Joan Marcus

Writing on his personal blog, Mark Langley (’89) reviews an off-Broadway performance of a new play — written and directed by a Tony and Pulitzer award-winning author — about two late members of the Thomas Aquinas College family, Louise and John Schmitt.

Louise and John SchmittLouise and John SchmittThe Schmitts were the parents of seven Thomas Aquinas College alumni, including Mr. Langley’s wife, Stephanie (’89), and the grandparents of six graduates and six current students. Mr. Schmitt, moreover, joined the teaching faculty in 1974 and was instrumental in organizing the College’s first Commencement ceremony. He left in 1979 to found the Trivium School, a residential high school offering a classical curriculum in Lancaster, Massachusetts. Many Trivium graduates have gone on to attend the College, and several of the College’s alumni have gone on to teach at Trivium.

Yet the reason that Mr. and Mrs. Schmitt figure so prominently in John Patrick Shanley’s recently debuted Prodigal Son has to do with their work prior to their time at the College, specifically in the 1960s, when Mr. Schmitt was the founding headmaster of the St. Thomas More School in New Hampshire. One of his students was a talented but rebellious boy who found his time at the school to be transformative. That student was Mr. Shanley, who has gone on to great acclaim as the screenwriter of Moonstruck and Doubt.

Featuring music by none other than Paul Simon, Prodigal Son tells the story of Jim Quinn, a character based on the adolescent Shanley. The Schmitts show extraordinary patience and dedication to the young man, for reasons, the audience learns, having largely to do with their own great personal suffering. As Mr. Langley writes:

“Mr. and Mrs. Schmitt .. share a well concealed sorrow, a sorrow caused by the tragic death of their own son. This sorrow becomes the source of Quinn’s redemption. Their hearts softened by grief, and harrowed by suffering, impel them to see the good in Quinn, despite his many expellable indiscretions, and they are able to see him through to the end — drawing out his hidden talents and mercifully allowing him to graduate — thus providing him with a sense of self-worth and new opportunity. …

“The play revealed a hidden chapter in the lives of John and Louise Schmitt. The events occurred when my wife was only a year old. Perhaps strangely, yet somewhat typical of many in that generation, Stephanie’s parents did not air their personal lives. They never spoke about these events to me and rarely if ever to their own children. In point of fact, John and Louise Schmitt suffered through not just one, but the tragic deaths of two of their children.”

The founder and the academic dean of The Lyceum, a classical school in Cleveland, Ohio, Mr. Langley writes that Prodigal Son “is about the mysterious role that suffering plays in life — even the seemingly senseless suffering and heartbreaking pain that comes with the death of one’s own child, one’s own son.” His wife, and her siblings, he adds, are “grateful for the gift that Shanley had given them through this play,” as it has helped to give them “an answer about the mysterious workings of God’s grace in the deaths of their siblings … deaths whose explanations until now had been consigned to the inexplicable mysteries of God’s Divine plan.”


 Mark (’89) and Colleen Donnelly (’14)

Tonight an audience at the University of British Columbia will be delighted by a father-daughter concert featuring two Thomas Aquinas College alumni, Mark (’89) and Colleen Donnelly (’14). The concert, billed as Love Songs Old & New, in honor of St. Valentine’s Day, is set to begin with the “Ecco la primavera” of Francesco Landini (d. 1397), and then continue on “through seven centuries and three languages.” It will feature masterpieces by Mozart and Beethoven as well as many Broadway favorites. Notably, the production will also include the premier of Mr. Donnelly’s musical setting of Alfred Noyes’ classic ballad “The Highwayman.”

An opera singer, teacher, and composer, Mr. Donnelly is most famous for leading crowds in the singing of “O Canada” at Vancouver Canucks’ home games. Since graduating from the College two years ago, Miss Donnelly has enrolled in the UBC’s School of Music, where she is concentrating in opera performance.

Readers in the Vancouver area can still purchase tickets online!


When asked to submit a video that explores “various aspects of wood” for a contest sponsored by the International Wood Culture Society, filmmaker André Fox (’05) thought of two of his fellow Thomas Aquinas College graduates, Dominic O’Reilly (’12) and Alex Tombelli (’13). Mr. O’Reilly is the head winemaster at Topa Mountain Winery in Ojai, California, where he works alongside Mr. Tombelli, a winemaker and carpenter. By combining his two crafts, Mr. Tombelli has developed an innovative new form of artistry — carving oak furniture from discarded wine barrels — that is the subject of the above video.

The video, which earned an honorable mention award in the category of “Wood & Humanity,” includes an original score by another alumnus, Jake DeTar (’11). Mr. Fox, the owner of André Fox Productions, shot all the photography and edited the documentary. His work can also be seen on the College’s recently released video, Praying Twice: The Thomas Aquinas College Choir.


November
30, 2015

Suzie Andres (’87) and Dr. Ronald P. McArthur

“There is no faster way to friendship than sharing the books you love,” writes Suzie Andres (’87) in her recent article, Books and Friendship with the Saints, in Catholic Exchange. “A friendship founded upon excellent books is bound to thrive.”

As a case in point, Mrs. Andres cites her own friendship with Thomas Aquinas College’s late founding president, Dr. Ronald P. McArthur. “This friendship started, as so many of his friendships did, with his sharing the Great Books that had such a profound effect on his life,” she recalls. “Ron McArthur had helped found a college; I needed to go to one. It was that simple, a match made in heaven through the medium of books.”

Fittingly, Mrs. Andres and Dr. McArthur’s last earthly encounters centered around a book on which the two collaborated, The Selected Sermons of Thomas Aquinas McGovern, S.J.:

“We’d both known (he, much longer than I) a wonderful Jesuit, Father Thomas Aquinas McGovern, who taught at Thomas Aquinas College for thirteen years, from the second semester of its founding to the second semester of my sophomore year. Father died suddenly of a heart attack in February of 1985. One day he was teaching my favorite class, the next morning he prayed at Mass ‘for all those who will die today,’ and that evening, he became one for whom he had enjoined us to pray.

“He left behind what amounted to three binders full of typed sermons, carefully polished gems of Catholic doctrine, pastoral guidance, and the love of Christ. From the time these were discovered, shortly after his death, Dr. McArthur hoped they could be made into a book.

“Twenty-nine years later, I had the privilege of bringing that book into being. It was certainly not a solo effort — many people helped bring that book into the world — but mine was the sweet joy of editing, the sincere joy of asking Dr. McArthur to write the foreword, the poignant joy of receiving that foreword from his family after he died (it was the last work he did and finished two days before his death).”

With Advent and preparations for the Christmas season now at hand, Mrs. Andres encourages — what else? — books as the perfect gift for friends old and new. “Don’t let the shiny things of this world distract you from the best we have to offer each other,” she writes. “Give a favorite book (or two or five or ten) and watch your friendships grow.”

And what better book to give than Mrs. Andres and Dr. McArthur’s own Selected Sermons of Thomas Aquinas McGovern, S.J.?

 


Campus Statue of St. Junipero Serra

To celebrate His Holiness Pope Francis’s canonization of California’s patron, St. Junipero Serra, Wendy-Irene (Grimm ’99) Zepeda has written the following hymn:

To the tune of “For All the Saints”

O faithful saint! Apostle to the West!
Founder of missions, striving without rest!
With you we sing, Junipero the blest:
Siempre adelante! Siempre adelante!

Though suffering illness, violence and fear,
You gave His love to those God brought you near;
Your footsore journeys spoke the Gospel clear!
Siempre adelante! Siempre adelante!

Come, ring the bell you rang in days of yore,
Come, plant the Cross again upon our shore!
Bring California to Christ’s heart once more!
Siempre adelante! Siempre adelante!

 St. Junipero Serra, pray for us!