Faith in Action Blog

Faith in Action Blog

Dr. Joseph Hattrup (third from left) and members of the University of St. Thomas Examining Board. (Photo courtesy of the University of St. Thomas)

When alumnus Joseph Hattrup (’01) joined the Thomas Aquinas College teaching faculty in 2006, he had already completed his doctoral studies (philosophy, University of St. Thomas), but not his dissertation. He therefore spent most of his vacation and free time over the last several years completing this requirement — a challenging task for a full-time college instructor and father of three young girls. His diligence, however, has paid off, and as a result, he has earned the title of doctor.

Last week, Dr. Hattrup traveled to the Center for Thomistic Studies at the University of Thomas in Houston, Tex. There, he successfully defended his dissertation, “Form and Predicability in Aristotle’s Categories and the Middle Books of the Metaphysics.”

“A widely received view about these works is that they contain doctrines of substance that are contradictory in principle and which therefore show significant changes in Aristotle’s thought,” Dr. Hattrup explains. “I argue that these two doctrines of substance, though different, are compatible with each other and not contradictory in principle. I hope the dissertation will help to demonstrate the unity and consistency of Aristotle’s thought and principles, especially as regards logic and metaphysics.”

The dissertation received unanimous approval of the Examining Board, which subjected Dr. Hattrup to two rounds of vigorous questioning. Dr. Edward Macierowski, an external reader on the committee and a professor of philosophy at Benedictine College, remarked: “Hattrup’s dissertation is not only a recognizable masterwork of a young philosopher, and so a convincing sign that he deserves the doctoral degree, but also the dissertation should be revised and submitted as soon as possible to publication at a major academic press.”

Congratulations, Dr. Hattrup!


Domiane Forte ('00)

“What do you do with the Church’s patrimony?’ asks architect Domiane Forte (’00) in the National Catholic Register. “The first and foremost duty is to keep it within the Church.”

The story, Time-Honored Treasures Find Homes in New Sacred Spaces, discusses Mr. Forte’s work on the St. Dominic Chapel, which he is designing for the Dominican Sisters of St. Cecilia Congregation in Nashville, Tenn. The principal of Forte & Associates, an architectural firm based in Santa Paula, Calif., Mr. Forte is also chairman of the College’s Greater Los Angeles Board of Regents.

After graduating from the College in 2000, he studied classical architecture at the University of Notre Dame under Duncan Stroik, the design architect for Our Lady of the Most Holy Trinity Chapel. Upon earning his master’s degree, Mr. Forte worked as a senior project manager for Appleton & Associates, Architects, in Santa Barbara, Calif., before launching his own practice in 2011. Earlier this year, he produced two artist’s renderings of the College’s next planned building, St. Gladys Hall.

Dedicated to preserving the Church’s patrimony of sacred architecture, Mr. Forte has recently begun work on another church design — for Our Lady of Guadalupe Shrine in Bakersfield, Calif.

 


April 11,
2013

“Suscipe me, Domine, secundum eloquium tuum et vivam, et non confundas me ab expectatione mea.”

“Receive me, Lord, as you have promised, and I shall live; do not disappoint me in my hope.”

— Rule of St. Benedict 58:21; Psalm 118[119]:116

Sr. Mary Josepha (Kathleen’07) Holcomb

Please pray for Sr. Mary Josepha (Kathleen’07) Holcomb, OSB, who on Saturday will pray the above psalm, as did St. Benedict, and make her first vows as a member of the Benedictines of Mary, Queen of the Apostles, in Gower, Mo. She will also receive the name Sister Mary Josefa of the Eucharist.

Thanks be to God!


The above video is a trailer for Diary of a Country Mother, a new book by Cynthia (Six ’77) Montanaro that chronicles the life of her beloved son Tim, with the liturgical year and changing seasons as a frame. The book reflects a yearlong journey of prayer and meditation, begun about six months after Tim’s death in 2005 at the age of 15. Written in diary form, it includes Scriptural, religious, and literary quotations, as well as beautiful photographs of Tim captured by his dad, Andrew Montanaro (’78).

“I envisioned an extended period of time in which to record, before memory failed me, all of the little humorous and profound incidents that made up my son Tim’s short life,” says Mrs. Montanaro. The result is a work that is replete with the love of a mother. That love is also on display in Mrs. Montanaro’s blog.

Writes Dr. Thomas Howard, author of Chance or the Dance and Hallowed Be This House, “Cynthia Montanaro have given us the story of a splendidly faithful Catholic household. … The word ‘contemplative’ is the key to this memoir … and the quiet pace belongs to its essence.… Every chapter (or meditation) entails some concrete, softly-textured, domestic narrative, all of it bespeaking both Tim’s inner man, and the household in which the Lord placed him to pass his brief time here on this earth.”

“Like Our Blessed Mother’s sorrow,” says fellow alumna author Suzie (Zeiter ’87) Andres, “Cynthia’s sadness is illuminated and shot through by the light of the resurrected Christ. This book is in no way depressing. Instead, Cynthia’s diary entries record time and again the peace that passes all understanding, the beautiful hope that only true faith can give, and most of all, love elevated and fulfilled by Love.”

A worthy read for the Easter season, Diary of a Country Mother is available via Amazon.com.


Frederick DouglassFrederick DouglassA professor of political science at Northern Illinois University, Dr. S. Adam Seagrave (’05), has written a thoughtful article for The Public Discourse about the present state of the pro-life movement:

In a manner similar to the case of slavery as outlined by Douglass, there are two simple points that, once admitted, join to condemn clearly the practice of abortion: (1) the embryo is a human being from the moment of conception, and (2) all human beings have a natural right to life.…

The problem is that the younger and less developed the embryo is, the less it excites what some have called our “moral sense,” our sympathy with it as another human being like us. And as Hume correctly notes, human beings tend to be moved more by their passions and feelings, including the so-called “moral sense,” than by their intellectual understanding of the world when determining their actions. Even if our reason and common sense tell us clearly — as they undoubtedly do — that the embryo is a human being with the right to life, our moral sense or sympathy lets us off the hook. 

So where does this leave pro-life advocates? How can we bridge the Humean — and human — gap between intellectual understanding and actual practice in our nation? The answer lies in the parallel between the issue of abortion and those of slavery and subsequent civil rights. The pro-life movement needs to model more closely in its organization and practices the antebellum abolition movement and the civil rights movement in order to achieve similar success in ending the evil of abortion.

The entire article, Abortion and Our “Moral Sense,” is available on The Public Discourse website, published by The Witherspoon Intstitute.


St. Francis and Pope Francis

Sean Fitzpatrick (’02),a frequent contributor to Crisis, has a new column that looks ahead to what we may expect from our new Holy Father, named for St. Francis of Assisi. The article begins …

As the newly elected pope, Jorge Mario Bergoglio’s papacy has already been historical. His is a part of the world no other pontiff has hailed from. His is an order no other pontiff has claimed. His is a name no other pontiff has taken. Even from this, it may be fair to expect that the pontificate of Pope Francis will be one to break with precedents and blaze new paths for the faithful. If ever there was a saint that did such a thing, it was his namesake. If ever there was a time that the Church would welcome a Francis, it is now.

… and it proceeds by looking at the life of St. Francis and the life of Pope Francis. See the whole story: Pope Francis — The Journey Begins.

Related:

 


Dr. Elizabeth Reyes ('03)Elizabeth Reyes (’03) — that is, Dr. Elizabeth Reyes (’03) has successfully defended her doctoral dissertation, with honors, at the Braniff Graduate School’s Institute of Philosophic Studies at the University of Dallas. After graduating from the College in 2003, she earned a master’s degree in English literature from the University of Dallas, and now, having defended her dissertation, has earned a doctorate as well.

Dr. Reyes joined the College’s faculty in 2011 after completing her doctoral studies, but not her dissertation. Over the last two years she has spent summers and other free moments working on her thesis, “Ishmael’s Cetological Quest: A Progression of Imagination in Melville’s Moby-Dick.”

Dr. Reyes’ thesis brings together two of her passions: wildlife and literature. A lifelong lover of animals, when she was a student at the College, she was fascinated to explore this interest across the breadth of the College’s curriculum — studying Creation not only through the natural sciences, but also in literature, philosophy, and theology. Her senior thesis examined how animals can help lead man to God, a theme that has endured throughout her academic career, including her doctoral dissertation about Ishmael’s epic journey in pursuit of the great whale.

The College extends Dr. Reyes a hearty congratulations!


An instructor of theology at Wyoming Catholic College, Kyle Washut (’07) recently presented a Lenten lecture titled, “The Importance and Significance of the ‘Great Fast’ for the Eastern Rite, and on Its Relevance to Roman Catholics.” In the talk, Mr. Washut, a Ukrainian Catholic, describes fasting as a preparation for encountering the Risen Lord at Easter. The video above gives a quick preview of the lecture, audio of which is available on the WCC website.


Kathleen Sullivan ('06)A doctoral student at the Catholic University of America, Kathleen Sullivan (’06) has served as a prefect at the Thomas Aquinas College Great Books High School Summer Program for each of the past eight years. She has recently written a reflection about her experience in the program:

… [I]t took me a couple more classes before I gathered my courage to enter into my class conversation. Once I did, it was the light turning on again. This was how school should be! To be responsible for my learning, to develop my critical thinking skills, to learn how to effectively communicate, to read and discuss these texts without the filter of an editor was all in my grasp. I wanted to skip the rest of high school and enter Thomas Aquinas College right away. Yet I returned to high school with a new perspective on education, and found myself more frequently raising my hand to ask questions or propose comments. An education is not passive; it is active, alive, and all within reach at colleges such at Thomas Aquinas where to be liberally educated is to be truly free.

Be sure to read the whole essay, and please share it with any high school juniors who may be interested in attending the 2013 program!


Sean Fitzpatrick ('02)Writer, illustrator, and educator Sean Fitzpatrick (’02) has a new story for Crisis magazine about the Pope’s surprising resignation, The Radical Return to Ratzinger. Long billed as a “radical” the Holy Father’s abdication, argues Mr. Fitzpatrick, is his first truly shocking act:

“For being such a radical Pope, the rest of the world can now truly say that Benedict came around to their meaning of the word. His resignation was, in a sense, the first radical thing this radical Pope ever did. If it is nothing else, it is at least surprising. But surprises are to be expected from those who follow Christ.”

Mr. Fitzpatrick is becoming something of a regular in Crisis, having penned two literary columns in December about fiction for the Christmas season.

 

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