Faith in Action Blog

Faith in Action Blog

Christina (Andres ’82) DeardurffChristina (Andres ’82) Deardurff“The Jubilee is a time of joy,” writes Christina (Andres ’82) Deardurff. “It is a time of remission of sins and universal pardon.”

Published on the Inside the Vatican website in May, shortly after His Holiness Pope Francis announced the Year of Mercy, Mrs. Deardurff’s story is an informative account of the significance of the current Jubilee and the graces that it makes available. “The Pope himself opens the door in St. Peter’s Basilica,” in a symbolic gesture, she writes, that “reflects the exclusion of Adam and Eve — and of the whole human family — from the Garden of Eden due to sin, and the readmittance into grace of the penitent of heart.”

A homeschooling mother of 10, Mrs. Deardurff recently joined the staff of Inside the Vatican as an editorial assistant at the magazine’s U.S. office in Front Royal, Virginia. Before taking a leave from writing and editing to raise her children, she worked in journalism and public relations, serving as an editor and contributor to Child and Family Review. She and her husband, Richard (’84), have also been active in promoting Catholic Montessori education and care for the mentally handicapped, particularly those with Down Syndrome.

An archive of Mrs. Deardurff’s other stories for Inside the Vatican is available on the magazine’s website.

 


When asked to submit a video that explores “various aspects of wood” for a contest sponsored by the International Wood Culture Society, filmmaker André Fox (’05) thought of two of his fellow Thomas Aquinas College graduates, Dominic O’Reilly (’12) and Alex Tombelli (’13). Mr. O’Reilly is the head winemaster at Topa Mountain Winery in Ojai, California, where he works alongside Mr. Tombelli, a winemaker and carpenter. By combining his two crafts, Mr. Tombelli has developed an innovative new form of artistry — carving oak furniture from discarded wine barrels — that is the subject of the above video.

The video, which earned an honorable mention award in the category of “Wood & Humanity,” includes an original score by another alumnus, Jake DeTar (’11). Mr. Fox, the owner of André Fox Productions, shot all the photography and edited the documentary. His work can also be seen on the College’s recently released video, Praying Twice: The Thomas Aquinas College Choir.


Dr. Adam Seagrave ('05)Dr. Adam Seagrave ('05)“It would be a mistake to think that even the total defeat and eradication of the organization known as ISIS will result in long-term peace and an absence of radical Islamic terrorism in Europe and the United States,” writes Dr. Adam Seagrave (’05) in The Public Discourse. “There is a much more powerful and permanent reason behind radical Islamic terrorism: the motivation to die for an other-worldly cause inevitably overpowers the motivation to live for this world.”

An assistant professor of political science at Northern Illinois University, Dr. Seagrave is the author of The Foundations of Natural Morality: On the Compatibility of Natural Rights and the Natural Law and editor of Liberty and Equality: The American Conversation. A regular contributor to The Public Discourse, he laments that there is neither a military nor a quick resolution to the threat of radical Islamic terrorism.

“If Western culture continues to be defined by the pitiful desire to go on living in as much physical comfort as possible, we will continue to be victimized and oppressed by the much more powerful appeal of radical Islam to die for God and eternal happiness,” Dr. Seagrave observes. “We in the West need to work to understand better and persuasively articulate the moral vision underlying liberalism, connecting this moral vision to the theological principles of Christianity.”

Dr. Seagrave contends that, for the last 500 years, the West has struggled between two competing visions of liberalism. The first is the Hobbesian model, more prevalent in Europe, which reduces the purpose of life to the pursuit of survival, pleasure, and power. Then there is a Christian/Lockean counterpart, which historically has been more influential in the United States, and which places Hobbesian individualism within a spiritual and moral framework that satisfies man’s yearning for meaning and guides his actions toward the good. To the extent that the Hobbesian model continues to dominate Western thought, Dr. Seagrave argues, the West will remain vulnerable to radical Islam. Only the Christian/Lockean vision, he insists, can provide a viable alternative.

“If we in the West are ultimately to withstand the threat of radical Islam to our way of life, we would do well to draw upon the resources in our intellectual and religious traditions that are powerful enough to inspire its continuing defense,” Dr. Seagrave concludes. “Without consistent and widespread efforts to provide a coherent and compelling alternative philosophy and way of life, all the military might in the world will not be able to resist the onslaught of Islamic extremism.”

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November
30, 2015

Suzie Andres (’87) and Dr. Ronald P. McArthur

“There is no faster way to friendship than sharing the books you love,” writes Suzie Andres (’87) in her recent article, Books and Friendship with the Saints, in Catholic Exchange. “A friendship founded upon excellent books is bound to thrive.”

As a case in point, Mrs. Andres cites her own friendship with Thomas Aquinas College’s late founding president, Dr. Ronald P. McArthur. “This friendship started, as so many of his friendships did, with his sharing the Great Books that had such a profound effect on his life,” she recalls. “Ron McArthur had helped found a college; I needed to go to one. It was that simple, a match made in heaven through the medium of books.”

Fittingly, Mrs. Andres and Dr. McArthur’s last earthly encounters centered around a book on which the two collaborated, The Selected Sermons of Thomas Aquinas McGovern, S.J.:

“We’d both known (he, much longer than I) a wonderful Jesuit, Father Thomas Aquinas McGovern, who taught at Thomas Aquinas College for thirteen years, from the second semester of its founding to the second semester of my sophomore year. Father died suddenly of a heart attack in February of 1985. One day he was teaching my favorite class, the next morning he prayed at Mass ‘for all those who will die today,’ and that evening, he became one for whom he had enjoined us to pray.

“He left behind what amounted to three binders full of typed sermons, carefully polished gems of Catholic doctrine, pastoral guidance, and the love of Christ. From the time these were discovered, shortly after his death, Dr. McArthur hoped they could be made into a book.

“Twenty-nine years later, I had the privilege of bringing that book into being. It was certainly not a solo effort — many people helped bring that book into the world — but mine was the sweet joy of editing, the sincere joy of asking Dr. McArthur to write the foreword, the poignant joy of receiving that foreword from his family after he died (it was the last work he did and finished two days before his death).”

With Advent and preparations for the Christmas season now at hand, Mrs. Andres encourages — what else? — books as the perfect gift for friends old and new. “Don’t let the shiny things of this world distract you from the best we have to offer each other,” she writes. “Give a favorite book (or two or five or ten) and watch your friendships grow.”

And what better book to give than Mrs. Andres and Dr. McArthur’s own Selected Sermons of Thomas Aquinas McGovern, S.J.?

 


Following his series of dispatches from Rome (see parts one, two, and three), Michael Van Hecke (’86) recently sat down for the above interview with the Cardinal Newman Society. “Two things struck me particularly,” he said of the conference. “One was the real commitment and passion by virtually every speaker about the importance of really making sure everybody keeps Christ in Catholic education, and [two] that Catholic education is still worth fighting for.”

An American delegate to the World Congress on Catholic Education, Mr. Van Hecke is the headmaster of St. Augustine Academy, a K-12 classical school in Ventura, California. He is also the president of the Catholic Schools Textbook Project and the president and founder of the Institute for Catholic Liberal Education.


Margaret and Stephen Chavez (’87) with their three daughters Margaret and Stephen Chavez (’87) with their three daughters

Stephen Chavez (’87) passed away unexpectedly in his sleep on November 20. He is the brother of Phillip Chavez (’86), Monica (Stoutz ’92), and Katherine (Kratz ’97). He is survived by his wife, Margaret, and their three daughters, Rachel, Sarah, and Rebekah.

Monday, November 30
Funeral Mass: 10:30 a.m.
St. Joseph’s Catholic Church
717 Bradford Ave.
Placentia, California
Burial immediately following, Queen of Heaven Cemetery

Donations may be directed to: “Stephen Chavez Memorial Fund” for education expenses of the three daughters of Stephen and Margaret: 16722 Meadowview Drive; Yorba Linda, CA 92886.


Below is the third in a series of reflections by Michael Van Hecke (’86), an American delegate to the World Congress on Catholic Education in Vatican City. (See parts one and two.)

View from Inside Rome

Michael Van Hecke (’86)Michael Van Hecke (’86)By Michael Van Hecke (’86)
World Congress on Education
Castel Gondolfo/Vatican City
Thursday, November 20, 2015

“This is a very important work!”

These were the kind and encouraging words we received from the prefect of the Holy See’s Congregation for Catholic Education, His Eminence Cardinal Giuseppe Versaldi. I met him earlier in the afternoon, then happened upon him in an empty lecture hall, paging through our All Ye Lands book. That was when he told me, “This is a very important work!” He will now take the textbook and our other Catholic Textbook Project materials back to the Vatican offices and review them some more.

This was a nice ending to another long day that featured a great variety of speakers on a wide range of topics. The morning sessions were particularly germane to us in our work at the Institute for Catholic Liberal Education, and for me personally as headmaster of St. Augustine Academy. Much of the morning was devoted to outlining the process and importance of forming those who form teachers — college teacher-formation programs and headmasters’ building the learning communities in their own schools. What was heartening was the clear and passionate appeal to make a theological and spiritual formation the centerpiece of any formation, be it of educational leaders, teachers, or students.

It was following these presentations that I had an opportunity to address the assembly. Introducing myself as headmaster of St. Augustine Academy, I spoke of my own efforts to build a sound, Catholic faculty who teach from a classical perspective. I invited everyone to consider the importance of remembering the great history of our Catholic intellectual tradition.

At this congress, like many professional conferences, there is a preponderant emphasis on the latest research and newest trends, as well as appeals to address the most current issues. And yet, if we are to celebrate the great anniversaries of Church proclamations on Catholic education, documents which stand on the shoulders of our intellectual custom, we need to look at today’s and tomorrow’s challenges from a vantage point of tradition. If we remain moored in our contemporary viewpoint, we will drift far from our potential. The rich traditions we have received in the Church were built on the experience of the centuries — an experience that, in every century, addressed problems in light of the wisdom the Church has received.

The first hint I had that I said something good was when a Canadian archbishop gave me a nice compliment on his way past my seat. Following my talk, I received many similar compliments. Despite the contemporary focus of the academic element of the Congress, it seems that many educators still understand the importance of our Catholic intellectual tradition. Another reason for hope. …

This is the end of our lovely sojourn at Castel Gandolfo. Tomorrow brings us to the closing gathering. A final report to follow.

Blessings to you all.

Arrivederci


Chapel candle rack

Please pray for the repose of the soul of Stephen Chavez (’87), who passed away unexpectedly in his sleep on November 20. He is the brother of Phillip Chavez (’86), Monica (Stoutz ’92), and Katherine (Kratz ’97). He is survived by his wife, Margaret, and their three daughters, Rachel, Sarah, and Rebekah. His funeral Mass and burial service will be held at Queen of Heaven Cemetery in Rowland Heights, California. Date and time to be announced.


Yesterday we posted the first in a series of reflections by Michael Van Hecke (’86), an American delegate to the World Congress on Catholic Education in Vatican City. Below is part two.

View from Inside Rome

Michael Van Hecke (’86)Michael Van Hecke (’86)By Michael Van Hecke (’86)
World Congress on Education
Castel Gondolfo/Vatican City
Thursday, November 19, 2015

During the first full day of the congress, I was very much occupied — with my list. As I met people, and passed them or had lunch next to them, I added them to a list of countries from which they hailed. I counted 62 nations — 62 nations of Catholic educators — and those are only the ones I personally encountered. I do not know the total number of nations represented, but what a grand exhibition of the universality of our church! How beautiful the commitment and love for the Church and children this showing represented. Second on my list of memorable moments today was meeting a most gracious son of the Church, one of the archbishops from Nigeria, and dozens of other holders of the torch of the Gospel mission from the African continent: Cameroon, Zimbabwe, the Ivory Coast, Congo, Gabon, etc. It was inspiring to be among them.

Other than that, it was a very long day, marked by almost two dozen talks. It was quite a lot to take in, given the worldwide representation and the global perspective. By global perspective, I do not refer to one idea that fits the whole globe, but many ideas emanating from a myriad circumstances of politics, ethnicity, religion, socioeconomic status, war, and persecution. It was overwhelming at points. Yet, in the face of all of that, the message of the necessity of the Gospel and love of neighbor reigned universal. It was the one thing all speakers had in common.

That was the upside.

One downside was a seeming lack of response to the many problems and challenges that face Catholic education. With all the “leaders” in Catholic education from so many varied areas of the world speaking, none seized upon one of the most obvious aids to improving education globally, and that is a better grasp of Christian anthropology as it relates to the manner and material of education. There seemed to be a collective misconception that our world has advanced tremendously from primitive cultures to a most advanced civilization. We seem to not see the beauty around us here in Rome, where every church seems to have a Bernini, Michelangelo, Caravaggio, or a Raphael. How has this come about? By education. By philosophy. By defining terms and honoring the dignity of man, which is a direct result of a growing Catholic intellectual custom. Why have we forgotten this? Why can we not consider our dilemma and ask the simple questions of how we got to where we are today — how have we come this far? And why are we now seeing so many troubles? And to ask all such questions and, yet, not despair!

However, questions from the floor, comments from some presenters, and many conversations between sessions revealed that there still is a common, collective, and reflective sense. Generally, the speakers seemed very committed and focused on the need for relationship and true, sound, Catholic education. The import of many of the participants was that a sound, liberal arts education, rooted in Catholic intellectual traditions, is the human piece of the puzzle that gets us there. It was clear that we need to renew the liberal arts approach, and we need to provide to students sound materials which support Catholic thought, philosophy, and moral structure.

Yes, there is hope. While there still remains confusion, as there always will, a big concern we see in speeches and the document is that we are increasing our reliance and dependence on governmental educational structures which are becoming more antithetical to our mission and the soul of Catholic education. We must recapture the passion and purpose of a true Catholic education. We must not succumb to social, economic, and political pressures — we must do everything it takes to provide sound Catholic education for our children. We must do this for the future of our Church and the future of civilization. As one speaker, representing parents from Italy, challenged the Church: “Do not close the schools!”

Arrivederci


Michael Van Hecke (’86)Michael Van Hecke (’86)Michael Van Hecke (’86), an American delegate to the World Congress on Catholic Education in Vatican City, has published the first in a planned series of dispatches about the international gathering of Catholic educators. The Church has convened the Congress to address “the challenges that the ‘educational emergency’ unavoidably provokes,” while commemorating the 50th anniversary of the Second Vatican Council’s declaration Gravissimum Educationis and the 25th anniversary of Pope St. John Paul’s Ex Corde Ecclesiae.

Prior to the start of the conference, Mr. Van Hecke and his wife, Jessie (Ellis ’86), paid a visit to the tomb of St. Monica, which prompted the following reflection:

“Everything was ordered correctly in St. Monica’s world. She knew her son’s profound intellectual gifts would take him far and wide and make him an intellectual figure of historic proportions, but she also knew that all that really mattered was his immortal soul’s salvation. This is exactly the right orientation to take to a meeting in which we contemplate and discuss Catholic education in the modern world. It is the proper orientation all Catholic education should be modeled upon, in any time or place, but especially the modern world. ‘Ever ancient, ever new,’ as Augustine said.

“If this Congress is to bless the world, it will be because it will have clearly defined Catholic education’s role as a tool of the Church to pass on Catholic culture, both intellectual and moral, to future generations. This culture we aim to pass on means nothing less than living our baptismal call to bring Christ to the world through love of neighbor with our ultimate end, Heaven, as the arbiter of all our acts and decisions.”

Mr. Van Hecke is the headmaster of St. Augustine Academy, a K-12 classical school in Ventura, California, that is consistently ranked among the best Catholic schools in the United States. He is also the president of the Catholic Schools Textbook Project and the president and founder of the Institute for Catholic Liberal Education (ICLE).

This blog will provide links to Mr. Van Hecke’s subsequent dispatches as they are published.