Faith in Action Blog

Faith in Action Blog

Phil (’97) and Luke Halpin (’98) on the set of Miles Christi: Soldiers of Christ in America
Phil (’97) and Luke Halpin (’98) on the set of Miles Christi: Soldiers of Christ in America

Two alumni brothers, Phil (’97) and Luke Halpin (’98), played significant roles in the production of a new one-hour documentary film, Miles Christi: Soldiers of Christ in America, which premiered on EWTN last Sunday night. The film explores a new order of priests, Miles Christi (soldiers of Christ), which is committed to helping lay Catholics pursue holiness in their everyday lives. Phil served as the project’s writer and editor, and Luke composed and produced the original score. Below is the film’s trailer:

“Documentary filmmaking is such a great way of presenting the truth in a logical manner that’s almost indisputable,” Luke recently told the National Catholic Register. “I see the documentary as a method of argument almost. It’s a chance to, in a very methodical way, lay out something you think is true and prove it.” Key to making that argument, he added, is maintaining the highest professional standards. “High-quality production is part of evangelization. ... You’re not going to evangelize anybody with crummy production work.”

Phil is the editor and producer for StoryTel, a creative foundation specializing in documentaries about people and organizations who answer God’s call to “restore the sacred.” Previously, he helped to produce Where Heaven Meets Earth, a documentary about a once-failing urban parish transformed by a young priest who was determined to embrace the whole of Catholic tradition. “Giving people hope is a worthy goal,” he says, “but going beyond that to inspire people to restore the sacred in their own lives and their own communities makes it worthwhile.”

In case you missed the first screening of Miles Christi, fear not. The documentary will air again on EWTN this Saturday, November 22, at 11:00 p.m. in the U.S. and Canada. It is also available on DVD.



Pater Edmund Waldstein, O.Cist. (’06); His Eminence Raymond Cardinal Burke; and Prof. Thomas Stark. Photo: CDO Photography

Earlier this month, Pater Edmund Waldstein, O.Cist. (’06), moderated a panel discussion about the recently concluded Synod on the Family, featuring Raymond Cardinal Burke, Prefect Emeritus of the Apostolic Signatura. Hosted by Una Voce Austria, the discussion was timed to coincide with the release of the German edition of Remaining in the Truth of Christ: Marriage and Communion in the Catholic Church, for which Cardinal Burke was a contributor. Joining His Eminence and Pater Edmund on the dais was Dr. Thomas Heinrich Stark, a professor of philosophy at the Philosophical-Theological College St. Pölten.

Prior to the panel, Pater Edmund, a Cistercian monk at Stift Heiligenkreuz in Vienna, delivered a talk, The Synod on the Family and the Opera, which focused on the work of two Viennese composers, W. A. Mozart and Richard Strauss. That talk is available via Pater’s blog, and video and audio from the panel discussion with Cardinal Burke are available below:

Audio, courtesy of Mr. Christopher Owen:

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“Don't like abortion? Don’t have one.” So read the pro-abortion bumper sticker of bygone days. There’s now an addendum: “But pay for mine.”

Thus begins an op-ed piece by Catherine Short (’80), who — as part of her 35-year effort in defense of the unborn — is taking on a new California policy that requires all insurance plans to provide abortion coverage. (Thomas Aquinas College is, mercifully, exempt from the mandate because it self-insures.)

As the legal director of the Life Legal Defense Foundation, which she helped to found, Mrs. Short recently sent a letter to the California Department of Managed Health Care (DMHC), decrying its shoddy legal pretext for the new policy:

The DMHC decision apparently rests on two untenable positions. The first is the self-evidently false proposition that all abortions, including elective abortions, are “medically necessary” and thus must be covered pursuant to the Knox-Keene Act. In the context of abortion, “medically necessary” and “elective” are antonyms. Second, the decision asserts that the California Constitution prohibits health plans from discriminating against women who choose to terminate a pregnancy. The California Constitution, a s currently interpreted, prohibits the state from discriminating against women who choose to terminate a pregnancy, by withholding funding for abortions. CDRR v. Myers , 29 Cal.3d 252 (1981). This decision does not prohibit private actors such as religious employers from deciding what services its employee health insurance policies will cover.

The letter additionally notes that the state’s policy is in plain violation of federal law. The 2004 Weldon Amendment prohibits states, such as California, that receive certain forms of federal funding from imposing abortion-coverage requirements without conscience exemptions. “California’s violation of federal law is clear,” writes Mrs. Short on aletia.com. “Equally clear is the Department of Health and Human Services’ mandate to enforce that law. What remains to be seen is whether the Administration will follow through on President Obama’s personal pledge to ‘honor the conscience of those who disagree with abortion.’”

 


Brenda Roscoe (’89)

Many thanks to Keith Roscoe, brother of Brenda (’89), who has provided the two photographs above from his sister’s graduation in 1989. He has also penned a loving obituary, and offers the following funeral information:

The Wake is scheduled for Friday, November 14 at 7:00 p.m. with the Recitation of the Most Holy Rosary and Prayers for the Repose of the Souls of the Dead. The Funeral Mass will be offered by Father John Horgan, Pastor, at St. Pius X Catholic Church in North Vancouver (B.C.) at 10:00 a.m. on Saturday, November 15, followed by a Reception in the Parish Hall. The casket burial of her mortal remains will take place on Monday, November 17, 2014, at 10:00 a.m. Gardens of Gethsemani Catholic Cemetery in Surrey, B.C. All are welcome to all services. …

In lieu of flowers, please leave a donation for Masses to be said for the Succour of the Poor Souls in Purgatory (Brenda Roscoe), care Fr. John Horgan of St. Pius X Catholic Church in North Vancouver.

Please continue to pray for the repose of Brenda’s soul and the consolation of the Roscoe family.


Chapel candle rack

A message from Rev. John Horgan, a friend of some alumni from Vancouver, B.C.:

Brenda Roscoe has died of a brain aneurism at the age of 48. She had recently returned from a holiday to England and came to see me on October 15. Fortified with the Sacraments of the Church, she died at Lions Gate Hospital suddenly on Wednesday, November 5. A wake with the Rosary will be offered on Friday, November 14 at 7:00 p.m. at St Pius X Parish in North Vancouver; the funeral Mass will be offered at St. Pius the next day at 10:00 a.m. Burial will follow on Monday, November 17, at the Gardens of Gethsemane.

Please keep Miss Roscoe and her family in your prayers.


Angela Baird (’00)

Today marks the 17th anniversary of the death of Angela Baird (’00), a champion of life. May her soul, and those of all the faithful departed, rest in peace.


Andrew Lang (’06) was in Oklahoma this past weekend to witness the priestly ordination of his friend and Thomas Aquinas College classmate, Rev. Andrew Norton, O.S.B. (’06). Mr. Lang has graciously provided the photos in the slideshow below, which feature several other alumni before and after the ordination.

  • Fr. Andrew Norton Ordination
    Slideshow: The Ordination of Rev. Andrew Marie Norton
  • Fr. Andrew Norton Ordination
    Slideshow: The Ordination of Rev. Andrew Marie Norton
  • Fr. Andrew Norton Ordination
    Slideshow: The Ordination of Rev. Andrew Marie Norton
  • Fr. Andrew Norton Ordination
    Slideshow: The Ordination of Rev. Andrew Marie Norton
  • Fr. Andrew Norton Ordination
    Slideshow: The Ordination of Rev. Andrew Marie Norton
  • Fr. Andrew Norton Ordination
    Slideshow: The Ordination of Rev. Andrew Marie Norton
  • Fr. Andrew Norton Ordination
    Slideshow: The Ordination of Rev. Andrew Marie Norton
  • Fr. Andrew Norton Ordination
    Slideshow: The Ordination of Rev. Andrew Marie Norton
  • Fr. Andrew Norton Ordination
    Slideshow: The Ordination of Rev. Andrew Marie Norton

Fr. Norton is one of 11 Thomas Aquinas College alumni at Our Lady of the Annunciation of Clear Creek Abbey in Hulbert, Oklahoma, including the Abbey’s subprior, Rev. Mark Bachmann, O.S.B. (’82). The ordination took place on October 26 the Abbey chapel, with the Most Rev. Edward J. Slattery of Tulsa serving as the ordaining bishop. Fr. Norton offered his first Mass the next morning.

“From now on,” writes Fr. Norton in a recent note in his family’s parish bulletin, “a successful day will be one on which I have said Mass ‘better,’ that is, with greater faith, hope and, charity; with my heart and mind more conformed to the Heart and Mind of Jesus; full to overflowing with zeal for God, His Father; and for humanity, for all, especially the weakest, most helpless, most ignorant, the most hardened sinners full of hate.”

Fr. Norton was one of three alumni to receive Holy Orders at Clear Creek on Saturday. Bishop Slattery also ordained Rev. Christian Felkner, O.S.B. (’01), to the priesthood and Br. Jereme Hudson, O.S.B. (’03), to the transitional diaconate. We will post photos from these ordinations as soon as they become available.

Deo Gratias!


Rev. Sebastian Walsge, O.Praem. ('94)On the final day of the recently concluded Synod on the Family, the Vatican’s official newspaper, L’Osservatore Romano, published an essay about the Synod’s purpose — and its challenges — by Rev. Sebastian Walshe, O.Praem. (’94). A professor of philosophy at St. Michael’s Abbey in Silverado, California, Fr. Sebastian argues that, “The stakes are high,” for the Synod. “For unless modern man can recapture the meaning which God has written into the natural human family, the result will be ignorance and error, indifference and animosity, toward the entire supernatural order.”

Fr. Sebastian continues:

Every artist has his favorite work of art, and God’s favorite is the human family. From all eternity, in fact, He understood himself as the Son of Mary, as a member of a human family. The reason for God’s predilection is that more than the other parts of His creation, the family reflected His own goodness and beauty. Hence, we cannot know God, we cannot love Him, without knowing and loving the natural human family. …

Consider how the modern distortions of the family can lead to distortions in faith. The indissolubility of marriage is intended to be a sign of God’s eternal and unique love for His Church. Is it any surprise then that religious pluralism and the denial that there is one Church is widespread in a society in which divorce and remarriage are widespread? The natural begetting of a child through the loving union of husband and wife is intended to be a sign that God creates each human soul immediately and with love. This reality is obscured in a society which accepts in vitro fertilization or other artificial means of procreation.… And in households where, by design, there is no father or there is no mother, how will the children come to understand God as Father or what it means for God to love us like a mother? … Examples could be multiplied but, suffice it to say, a lack of love and esteem for the goodness of the natural family entails a lack of love and esteem for God and the things of heaven.

The bishops, writes Fr. Sebastian, are “striving to interpret to the world the supernatural significance of the natural family” — a task that is treacherous, but essential.

The full article is available via the Vatican’s news website.


Maria Barrett (’14)The College has received word that on the Feast of All Saints, November 1, Maria Barrett (’14) will enter the Monastery of Our Lady of the Rosary. There, as a postulant, she will join the Dominican Nuns of Summit, New Jersey, in their life of perpetual adoration of the Blessed Sacrament and recitation of the Holy Rosary.

Despite sensing a vocation to the religious life for many years, Miss Barrett admits that, until recently, she never expected to become a Dominican. In an interview at the time of her graduation, she explained that she had not considered the Order of Preachers until her senior year, when she providentially stumbled upon a copy of One Mind and Heart in God: Dominican Monastic Life. “I put it on my shelf, and then only sometime later started reading it,” she said. “And it was kind of amazing, because it was exactly what I wanted.”

The serenity of life at the College, Miss Barrett said, gave her the peace of mind and contemplative setting that allowed her to discern God’s call more clearly. “Here, things are slower, so you are able to think more deeply and pray more.”

Please keep Miss Barrett and her vocation in your prayers.


Dr. Joseph P. Hattrup (’01)Dr. Joseph P. Hattrup (’01) now a tutor at the College, recently gave an on-campus presentation, “The Fall of Mount Atlas.” Text and audio are available via the College’s website.